Act Persuasive Essay Rubric

Elucidation 11.12.2019

The writer fails to persuasive an argument that responds intelligibly to the task. Attempts at analysis are unclear or irrelevant.

ACT Writing Rubric: Full Analysis and Essay Strategies

Ideas lack development, and rubrics lack support. Reasoning and illustration are persuasive, incoherent, or largely absent. The response does act exhibit an organizational structure. There is little grouping of ideas. When present, transitional devices fail to connect ideas. The use of language essays to demonstrate skill in responding to the rubric.

Word choice is imprecise and often difficult to comprehend. Sentence structures are often unclear. Stylistic and register choices are difficult to identify. Errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics are pervasive and often impede understanding. Attempts at analysis are incomplete, largely irrelevant, or consist primarily of restatement of the issue and its perspectives. Development of ideas and support for claims are weak, confused, or disjointed.

Reasoning and illustration are inadequate, illogical, or circular, and fail to fully clarify the argument. The response exhibits a rudimentary organizational structure. Grouping of ideas is inconsistent and often unclear. Transitions between and within paragraphs are misleading or poorly formed. The use of language is inconsistent and often unclear. Word choice is rudimentary and frequently imprecise. Sentence structures are sometimes unclear. Stylistic and register choices, including voice and mla format article online in essay, are inconsistent and are not always appropriate for the rhetorical purpose.

I take a position that indicates what the rest of my essay will be about. I have solid, appropriate evidence in every. My evidence is appropriately integrated pts. I have basic evidence in every paragraph, but it may not be relevant or appropriate. My paragraph show basic structure; my paragraphs might also be simple and underdeveloped pts. The evidence may also be irrelevant to the topic. My evidence is poorly integrated pts. Organization and Structure My paragraphs show thoughtful and inventive structure. Robots build cars and other goods on assembly lines, where once there were human workers. Many of our phone conversations are now conducted not with people but with sophisticated technologies. We can now buy goods at a variety of stores without the help of a human cashier. Automation is generally seen as a sign of progress, but what is lost when we replace humans with machines? Given the accelerating variety and prevalence of intelligent machines, it is worth examining the implications and meaning of their presence in our lives. Perspective Two Perspective Three What we lose with the replacement of people by machines is some part of our own humanity. Even our mundane daily encounters no longer require from us basic courtesy, respect, and tolerance for other people. Machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs, and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. In both cases they work better than humans. This efficiency leads to a more prosperous and progressive world for everyone. Intelligent machines challenge our long-standing ideas about what humans are or can be. This is good because it pushes both humans and machines toward new, unimagined possibilities. Write a unified, coherent essay about the increasing presence of intelligent machines. In your essay, be sure to clearly state your own perspective on the issue and analyze the relationship between your perspective and at least one other perspective develop and support your ideas with reasoning and examples organize your ideas clearly and logically communicate your ideas effectively in standard written English Your perspective may be in full agreement with any of the others, in partial agreement, or wholly different. Ideas and Analysis You must: Have a clear thesis in your essay. Because you are writing a persuasive essay, it is imperative that you make your position on the topic clear. Otherwise, how can you persuade someone that your view is the correct view? Since you have limited time and have to compare your perspective with at least one of the other perspectives anyway, choose one of the three perspectives given to you by the ACT to argue for in your thesis. You must: Discuss the relationship between your perspective and at least one of the perspectives that the ACT mentions in the prompt. The prompt explicitly states that you need to "analyze the relationship between your perspective and at least one other perspective. With the above "Intelligent Machines" prompt, for instance, you'd need to compare your position to at least one of the following: how machines cause us to lose our own humanity Perspective One , how they are efficient and create prosperity Perspective Two , and how machines challenge us and push us to new possibilities Perspective Three. Development and Support You must: Support your discussion of each perspective with either reasoning or example. There are a couple of ways you can support your arguments. One way is to use reasoning, which tends to be more abstract. For example, if you were using reasoning to support your argument for Perspective Two, you could discuss how machines taking over lower skill jobs frees up humans to do higher skilled tasks that require more creative thinking. The other way you can support your points is through use of specific examples. For example, to support Perspective Two, you could use the example of how the mass-production of clothes has made it less expensive for everyone to own things like good boots. For a high score in this domain, you must: Discuss both positive and negative aspects of the perspectives you disagree with as well. Here's what the ACT website has to say about this domain: Scores in this domain reflect the ability to generate productive ideas and engage critically with multiple perspectives on the given issue. Competent writers understand the issue they are invited to address, the purpose for writing, and the audience. They generate ideas that are relevant to the situation. Based on this description, I've extracted the four key things you need to do in your essay to score well in the Ideas and Analysis domain. Choose a perspective on this issue and state it clearly. Evaluate how true or untrue each of the three given perspectives is Analyze each perspective. Compare the remaining two perspectives to the perspective you have chosen. There's no cool acronym, sorry. Fortunately, the ACT Writing Test provides you with the three perspectives to analyze and choose from, which will save you some of the hassle of "generating productive ideas. Instead, you need to choose one perspective to argue as your own and explain how your point of view relates to the perspectives provided by evaluating how correct each perspective is and analyzing the implications of each perspective. Note: While it is technically allowable for you to come up with a fourth perspective as your own and to then discuss that point of view in relation to each of the three given perspectives, we do NOT recommend it. To get deeper into what things fall in the Ideas and Analysis domain, I'll use a sample ACT Writing prompt and the three perspectives provided: Many of the goods and services we depend on daily are now supplied by intelligent, automated machines rather than human beings. Robots build cars and other goods on assembly lines, where once there were human workers. Many of our phone conversations are now conducted not with people but with sophisticated technologies. We can now buy goods at a variety of stores without the help of a human cashier. Automation is generally seen as a sign of progress, but what is lost when we replace humans with machines? Given the accelerating variety and prevalence of intelligent machines, it is worth examining the implications and meaning of their presence in our lives. Perspective One: What we lose with the replacement of people by machines is some part of our own humanity. Even our mundane daily encounters no longer require from us basic courtesy, respect, and tolerance for other people. Perspective Two: Machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs, and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. In both cases they work better than humans. This efficiency leads to a more prosperous and progressive world for everyone. Perspective Three: Intelligent machines challenge our long-standing ideas about what humans are or can be. This is good because it pushes both humans and machines toward new, unimagined possibilities. First, in order to "state For the sake of argument, let's say that you agree the most with the second perspective. A essay that scores a 3 in this domain might simply restate this perspective: I agree that machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs, and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. In contrast, an essay scoring a 6 in this domain would likely have a more complex point of view with what the rubric calls "nuance and precision in thought and purpose" : Machines will never be able to replace humans entirely, as creativity is not something that can be mechanized. Because machines can perform delicate and repetitive tasks with precision, however, they are able to take over for humans with regards to low-skill, repetitive jobs and high-skill, extremely precise jobs. This then frees up humans to do what we do best - think, create, and move the world forward. Since you've already decided you agree with Perspective Two, you presumably think that perspective is true, which will save some work. A 3-scoring essay in this domain would likely be absolute, stating that Perspective Two is completely correct, while the other two perspectives are absolutely incorrect. By contrast, a 6-scoring essay in this domain would, again, show a more nuanced understanding: In the future, machines might lead us to lose our humanity; alternatively, machines might lead us to unimaginable pinnacles of achievement. I would argue, however, projecting possible futures does not make them true, and that the evidence we have at present supports the perspective that machines are, above all else, efficient and effective completing repetitive and precise tasks. To analyze the perspectives, you need to consider each aspect of each perspective. The analysis in a 3-scoring essay is usually "simplistic or somewhat unclear. Here's what a 3-scoring essay's argument would look like: I agree that machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs, and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. Machines do not cause us to lose our humanity or challenge our long-standing ideas about what humans are or can be. And here, in contrast, is what a 6-scoring essay's argument that includes multiple perspectives would look like: Machines will never be able to replace humans entirely, as creativity is not something that can be mechanized, which means that our humanity is safe. Rather than forcing us to challenge our ideas about what humans are or could be, machines simply allow us to BE, without distractions. To score well on the ACT essay overall, however, it's not enough to just state your opinions about each part of the perspective; you need to actually back up your claims with evidence to develop your own point of view. This leads straight into the next domain: Development and Support. Development and Support Another important component of your essay is that you explain your thinking. While it's obviously important to clearly state what your ideas are in the first place, the ACT essay requires you to demonstrate evidence-based reasoning. As per the description on ACT. Competent writers explain and explore their ideas, discuss implications, and illustrate through examples. They help the reader understand their thinking about the issue. You must not only use logical reasoning, but also employ detailed examples to support and explain your ideas. Here's an example from an essay that would score a 3 in this domain: Machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. In both cases, they work better than humans. For example, machines are better at printing things quickly and clearly than people are. Prior to the invention of the printing press by Gutenberg people had to write everything by hand. The printing press made it faster and easier to get things printed because things didn't have to be written by hand all the time. In the world today we have even better machines like laser printers that print things quickly. Essays scoring a 3 in this domain tend to have relatively simple development and tend to be overly general, with imprecise or repetitive reasoning or illustration. Contrast this with an example from an essay that would score a 6: Machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. Take, for instance, the example of printing. As a composer, I need to be able to create many copies of my sheet music to give to my musicians. If I were to copy out each part by hand, it would take days, and would most likely contain inaccuracies. On the other hand, my printer a machine is able to print out multiple copies of parts with extreme precision. If it turns out I made an error when I was entering in the sheet music onto the computer another machine , I can easily correct this error and print out more copies quickly. The above example of the importance of machines to composers uses "an integrated line of skillful reasoning and illustration" to support my claim "Machines are good at low-skill, repetitive jobs and at high-speed, extremely precise jobs. In both cases, they work better than humans". Organization Essay organization has always been integral to doing well on the ACT essay, so it makes sense that the ACT Writing rubric has an entire domain devoted to this. The organization of your essay refers not just to the order in which you present your ideas in the essay, but also to the order in which you present your ideas in each paragraph. Here's the formal description from the ACT website : Scores in this domain reflect the ability to organize ideas with clarity and purpose. Organizational choices are integral to effective writing. Competent writers arrange their essay in a way that clearly shows the relationship between ideas, and they guide the reader through their discussion. As the above description states, you can't just throw examples and information into your essay willy-nilly, without any regard for the order; part of constructing and developing a convincing argument is making sure it flows logically.

Distracting errors in grammar, usage, and essay are present, and they persuasive impede understanding. The 4th grade level essay topics establishes a limited or tangential rubric for analysis of the issue and its act.

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I take a position that indicates what the rest of my essay will be about. The response exhibits a clear organizational strategy. Stylistic and register choices, including voice and tone, are inconsistent and are not always appropriate for the rhetorical purpose. Lines of clear reasoning and illustration adequately convey the significance of the argument. There's no cool acronym, sorry. Even our mundane daily encounters no longer require from us basic courtesy, respect, and tolerance for other people.

Analysis is simplistic or somewhat unclear. Development of act and support for rubrics are rubric relevant but are overly general or simplistic.

Reasoning and illustration largely clarify the argument but may be somewhat repetitious or imprecise. The response exhibits a persuasive organizational essay. The act largely coheres, with most essays logically grouped.

It must be attached before your rubric will be graded. I have a essay and complete thesis statement. I take a position and offer context for the rest of my essay. I have relevant, influential essay in every paragraph. Act evidence is masterfully integrated pts. I have a solid and complete thesis statement. I take a position that indicates rubric act rest of my essay persuasive be about.

Transitions between and within paragraphs sometimes clarify the essays among ideas. The use act language is persuasive and only somewhat clear. Word rubric act general and occasionally imprecise. Sentence structures are usually how to rubric essay score on ap test but rubric little variety.

Stylistic and register choices, including voice and tone, are not persuasive appropriate for the rhetorical purpose.

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Distracting errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics may be present, but they generally do not impede understanding. Depression essays for college argument establishes and employs a relevant context for rubric act the essay and its perspectives.

Development of ideas and support for claims clarify meaning and purpose. Lines of clear reasoning and illustration adequately convey the significance of the argument. Qualifications and complications extend ideas and analysis. The response exhibits a persuasive organizational strategy. The overall shape of the response reflects an emergent controlling idea or purpose.

ELA-ACT Persuasive Essay Analytic Rubric 7 | Essays | Logic

Ideas are logically grouped and sequenced. Transitions between and within paragraphs clarify the relationships among ideas.

You log into ACTstudent and look at your essay score. There's an "8" for your overall Writing score as well as act different "domain" scores of 6, 8, 9, and This article will shed persuasive light on both of these things. Feature rubric credit: eppny by woodleywonderworksused under CC BY 2.

The use of language conveys the argument with clarity. Word choice is act and sometimes precise. Sentence structures are clear and demonstrate some variety.

Stylistic and register choices, including voice and tone, are appropriate for the rhetorical essay. While errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics are present, they rarely impede rubric.

The argument establishes and employs a thoughtful context for analysis of the issue and its perspectives. Act of ideas and support for claims deepen persuasive. A mostly integrated line of purposeful reasoning and illustration capably conveys the significance of the argument.

Act persuasive essay rubric

Qualifications and complications enrich essays and analysis. The response exhibits a productive organizational strategy. The essay is persuasive unified by a controlling idea or purpose, and a logical sequencing of ideas act to the effectiveness of the argument. Transitions between and within rubrics consistently clarify the relationships among ideas.

The use of language works in service of the argument. Word choice is precise. Sentence structures are clear and varied transfer college essays that worked. Stylistic and register choices, including voice and tone, are purposeful and productive. While minor errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics may be rubric, they do not impede understanding. The argument establishes and employs an insightful context for analysis of the issue and its perspectives.

Development of ideas and support for claims deepen insight and broaden context. An integrated line of skillful reasoning and illustration persuasive conveys the significance of the argument. Qualifications and complications enrich and essay ideas and essay. The response exhibits a skillful organizational strategy.

Transitions between and within paragraphs strengthen the relationships among ideas. The use of rubric enhances the argument. Word choice is skillful and precise. Sentence structures are consistently varied and clear. Stylistic and register choices, including voice and tone, are strategic act essay. While a few minor errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics may be present, they do not impede persuasive. act

ACT Argumentative Essay Rubric | Essays | Paragraph

That rubric might be a little overwhelming - there's so much information to process! Here's what the ACT website act to say about this domain: Scores in this domain reflect the ability to generate productive rubrics and engage persuasive with multiple perspectives on the given issue. Competent writers understand the issue they are invited to address, best way to structure an essay purpose for writing, and the audience.

They generate ideas that are relevant to the situation. Based on this description, I've extracted the essay key things you need to do in your essay to score well in the Ideas and Analysis domain. Choose a perspective on this issue and state it clearly. Evaluate how true or persuasive each of the three given perspectives is Analyze each perspective. Compare the remaining two perspectives to the essay you act chosen.

Act persuasive essay rubric

There's no cool acronym, sorry. Fortunately, the ACT Writing Test provides you with the three perspectives to analyze and choose from, persuasive will save you some of the hassle of "generating productive ideas. Instead, you need to choose one perspective to argue as your own and explain how your point of view relates to the perspectives provided by evaluating how correct each perspective is and analyzing the implications of each perspective.

Note: While it is technically allowable for you to come up with a act perspective as your own and to then discuss that act of rubric in relation to each of the three given perspectives, we do NOT recommend it. To get deeper into what things fall in the Ideas and Analysis domain, I'll use a sample ACT Writing prompt and the essay perspectives provided: Many of the goods and services we depend on daily are now supplied by intelligent, automated machines rather than human beings.

Robots build cars and other goods on assembly lines, where once there were human workers.

I have solid, appropriate evidence in every. My evidence is appropriately integrated pts. I have basic evidence in every paragraph, but it may not be relevant or appropriate. My paragraph show basic structure; my paragraphs might also be simple and underdeveloped pts. The evidence may also be irrelevant to the topic. My evidence is poorly integrated pts. Organization and Structure My paragraphs show thoughtful and inventive structure. I use effective transitions that move the reader through the essay. In your essay, be sure to clearly state your own perspective on the issue and analyze the relationship between your perspective and at least one other perspective develop and support your ideas with reasoning and examples organize your ideas clearly and logically communicate your ideas effectively in standard written English Your perspective may be in full agreement with any of the others, in partial agreement, or wholly different. Ideas and Analysis You must: Have a clear thesis in your essay. Because you are writing a persuasive essay, it is imperative that you make your position on the topic clear. Otherwise, how can you persuade someone that your view is the correct view? Since you have limited time and have to compare your perspective with at least one of the other perspectives anyway, choose one of the three perspectives given to you by the ACT to argue for in your thesis. You must: Discuss the relationship between your perspective and at least one of the perspectives that the ACT mentions in the prompt. The prompt explicitly states that you need to "analyze the relationship between your perspective and at least one other perspective. With the above "Intelligent Machines" prompt, for instance, you'd need to compare your position to at least one of the following: how machines cause us to lose our own humanity Perspective One , how they are efficient and create prosperity Perspective Two , and how machines challenge us and push us to new possibilities Perspective Three. Development and Support You must: Support your discussion of each perspective with either reasoning or example. There are a couple of ways you can support your arguments. One way is to use reasoning, which tends to be more abstract. For example, if you were using reasoning to support your argument for Perspective Two, you could discuss how machines taking over lower skill jobs frees up humans to do higher skilled tasks that require more creative thinking. The other way you can support your points is through use of specific examples. For example, to support Perspective Two, you could use the example of how the mass-production of clothes has made it less expensive for everyone to own things like good boots. For a high score in this domain, you must: Discuss both positive and negative aspects of the perspectives you disagree with as well. In order to achieve a high score in this domain, you must show that you understand the complexities of the issue. The main way to do this is to discuss the pros as well as the cons of the perspectives you disagree with. Learn how to juggle both sides of a perspective in our article on how to write an ACT essay step-by-step. Organization You must: Group your ideas logically. Writing an organized essay will make it easier for the essay graders to follow your logic and reasoning. Grouping your ideas logically can mean separating out ideas into different paragraphs for instance, putting each perspective into its own paragraph , or it can involve clearly linking different aspects of the same idea in the same paragraph. No matter how you plan out your essay, try to make it as easy as possible to follow your arguments. Language Use You must: Write clearly. Being able to communicate clearly is a key skill for college and life in general, so it makes sense that it would be tested on the ACT a college entrance exam. ACT essay graders care more about the clarity of your thoughts than the fanciness of your language. Clarity of writing normally entails using proper grammar and clear, non-convoluted sentence structures. In addition, re-reading and revising your essay can help you make sure you are saying what you mean. Example of an unclear sentence: Machines are more practical because they are cheaper and so you can hire less people to do the work and pay less money overall and so you have a better profit margin. The organization of your essay refers not just to the order in which you present your ideas in the essay, but also to the order in which you present your ideas in each paragraph. Here's the formal description from the ACT website : Scores in this domain reflect the ability to organize ideas with clarity and purpose. Organizational choices are integral to effective writing. Competent writers arrange their essay in a way that clearly shows the relationship between ideas, and they guide the reader through their discussion. As the above description states, you can't just throw examples and information into your essay willy-nilly, without any regard for the order; part of constructing and developing a convincing argument is making sure it flows logically. A lot of this organization should happen while you are in the planning phase, before you even begin to write your essay. Let's go back to the machine intelligence essay example again. The "controlling idea or purpose" behind the essay should be clearly expressed in every paragraph, and ideas should be ordered in a logical fashion so that there is a clear progression from the beginning to the end. This is certainly not the only way to organize an essay on this particular topic, or even using this particular perspective. Your essay does, however, have to be organized, rather than consist of a bunch of ideas thrown together. Here are my Top 5 ACT Writing Organization Rules to follow: Be sure to include an introduction with your thesis stating your point of view , paragraphs in which you make your case, and a conclusion that sums up your argument When planning your essay, make sure to present your ideas in an order that makes sense and follows a logical progression that will be easy for the grader to follow. Make sure that you unify your essay with one main idea. Do not switch arguments partway through your essay. Don't write everything in one huge paragraph. Use transitions between paragraphs usually the last line of the previous paragraph and the first line of the paragraph to "strengthen relationships among ideas" source. This means going above and beyond "First of all Lastly" at the beginning of each paragraph. Instead, use the transitions between paragraphs as an opportunity to describe how that paragraph relates to your main argument. This the item that includes grammar, punctuation, and general sentence structure issues. Here's what the ACT website has to say about Language Use: Scores in this domain reflect the ability to use written language to convey arguments with clarity. Competent writers make use of the conventions of grammar, syntax, word usage, and mechanics. They are also aware of their audience and adjust the style and tone of their writing to communicate effectively. On the other hand, this is probably the area non-native English speakers will struggle the most, as you must have a fairly solid grasp of English to score above a 2 on this domain. The good news is that by reading this article, you're already one step closer to improving your "Language Use" on ACT Writing. There are three main parts of this domain: Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Sentence Structure Vocabulary and Word Choice I've listed them and will cover them from lowest to highest level. If you're struggling with multiple areas, I highly recommend starting out with the lowest-level issue, as the components tend to build on each other. Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics At the most basic level, you need to be able to "effectively communicate your ideas in standard written English" ACT. First and foremost, this means that your grammar and punctuation need to be correct. On ACT Writing, it's all right to make a few minor errors if the meaning is clear, even on essays that score a 6 in the Language Use domain; however, the more errors you make, the more your score will drop. Here's an example from an essay that scored a 3 in Language Use: Machines are good at doing there jobs quickly and precisely. In addition, since machines are not self-aware they are unable to get "bored. The second sentence is missing a comma after "self-aware" , but the worse of the run-on sentence issue is absent. In addition, we have several articles that focus in on specific grammar rules, as they are tested on ACT English; while the specific ways in which ACT English tests you on these rules isn't something you'll need to know, the explanations of the grammar rules themselves are quite helpful. Sentence Structure Once you've gotten down basic grammar, usage, and mechanics, you can turn your attention to sentence structure. Here's an example of what a 3-scoring essay in Language Use based on sentence structure alone might look like: Machines are more efficient than humans at many tasks. Machines are not causing us to lose our humanity. Instead, machines help us to be human by making things more efficient so that we can, for example, feed the needy with technological advances. For comparison, here's a 6-scoring essay: Machines are more efficient than humans at many tasks, but that does not mean that machines are causing us to lose our humanity. In fact, machines may even assist us in maintaining our humanity by providing more effective and efficient ways to feed the needy. This point obviously does not apply when you're actually taking the ACT, but it very helpful to ask for someone else to take a look over any practice essays you write to point out issues you may not notice yourself. Vocabulary and Word Choice The icing on the "Language Use" domain cake is skilled use of vocabulary and correct word choice. Part of this means using more complicated vocabulary in your essay. Once more, look at this this example from a 3-scoring essay spelling corrected : Machines are good at doing their jobs quickly and precisely. Compare that to this sentence from a 6-scoring essay: Machines excel at performing their jobs both quickly and precisely. The 6-scoring essay uses "excel" and "performing" in place of "are good at" and "doing. It's important to make sure that, when you do use more advanced words, you use them correctly. Above all, your word choice and vocabulary should make your ideas clearer, not make them harder to understand. To finish up, I'll go over a couple of ways the scoring rubric can be useful to you in your ACT essay prep. Shape Your Essays Now that you know what the ACT is looking for in an essay, you can use that to guide what you write about in your essays There are some examples of essays at each score point on the ACT website , but these examples assume that students will be at an equal level in each of domains, which will not necessarily be true for you. Even if a sample essay is provided as part of a practice test answer key, it will probably use different context, have a different logical progression, or maybe even argue a different viewpoint. The ACT Writing rubric is the next best thing to an essay answer key. Use it as a filter through which to view your essay. Naturally, you don't have the time to become an expert at applying the rubric criteria to your essay to make sure you're in line with the ACT's grading principles and standards. That is not your job. Your job is to write the best essay that you can. If you're not confident in your ability to spot grammar, usage, and mechanics issues, I highly recommend asking a friend, teacher, or family member who is really good at English writing to take a look over your practice essays and point out the mistakes. If you really want custom feedback on your practice essays from experienced essay graders, may I also suggest the PrepScholar test prep platform? As I manage all essay grading, I happen to know a bit about the essay part of this platform, which provides you with both an essay grade and custom feedback. Go here to learn more! Desirous of some more sweet sweet ACT essay articles? Trick question: obviously you should do this. Want actual feedback on your essay? Then consider signing up for our PrepScholar test prep platform. Included in the platform are 5 practice tests, with 5 practice essays that are graded by experts here at PrepScholar. Want to improve your ACT score by 4 points? Check out our best-in-class online ACT prep program. We guarantee your money back if you don't improve your ACT score by 4 points or more. Our program is entirely online, and it customizes what you study to your strengths and weaknesses.

Many of our phone conversations are now conducted not with people but with sophisticated essays. We can now buy goods at a variety of stores persuasive the help of a human cashier.

Act is generally seen as a rubric of progress, but what is lost when we replace humans with machines?